HouseTek Inspections
Copyright © 2015 HouseTek Professional Home Inspections
 Inspection Excellence 
home inspection, house inspector, inspection, inspector, Real Estate Listings, home buyers and sellers
Your Protection Is My Business!
Iron Mountain MI Home Inspector, Home Inspector, Iron Mountain, Florence WI, real-estate inspector, Upper Peninsula Home Inspector, Wisconsin Home Inspector, MIchigan Home Inspector, Wisconsin Home Inspector, Crystal Falls Home Inspector, Wisconsin, Michi real-estate inspector HouseTek Professional Home Inspections - Your Protection is My Business!

Hiring an Inspector

 

Price is What You Pay. Value is What You Get."  - Warren Buffett Getting an INDEPENDENT (not referred to by an agent), expert opinion on the operability of the structure and its systems is smart buying. But, not all home inspectors have the same experience, training, certifications, or ethics.  How do you make sure you hire the right person for the job? When shopping for a home inspector, it's vital that you do your homework and interview each inspector based on the checklist below. Do not go by price alone.  When hiring me, you're hiring an advocate with your best interest in mind to give you my expert opinion on the house's condition - in writing. With that in mind, making sure that you're hiring an inspector with plenty of knowledge and training means not shopping by price alone. Training, certifications, licensing, and continuing education costs money. When it comes to home inspections, as with most things, you get what you pay for.  Don't go with a builder who 'dabbles' in home inspections for a 'quick easy 300 bucks', or the guy who gets the cheesiest certification possible, or the agent referred inspector who doesn't want to 'kill the deal'.  You probably won't get the service you expect. You will come out WAY ahead by hiring a careful, independent inspector who may find thousands of dollars in repairs. This way you can make sure things are fixed, or renegotiate a new price prior to closing.  OR you can save twenty bucks on a fly-by-night guy who rubber-stamps a house as basically ok, many times to just avoid conflict. Research credentials.  Find an ASHI Certified Member (American Society of Home Inspectors). Since there are no national standards for home inspectors, one of the best things you can do to find out about an inspectors qualifications is to ask what associations they belong to.  ASHI is the real deal.  ASHI requires training, experience, continuing education and passing nationally recognized exams (not a non- proctored on-line exam). Not all associations are created equal.  Check out the associations minimum requirements.  Some associations have candidate and associate, or other levels that basically mean that the inspector has not met the requirements to be a full member.  Also ask what certifications the inspector holds and then research them as well.   Not only am I an ASHI Certified Inspector, I am Code Certified Residential Building Inspector, state licensed, and college degreed in engineering (B.S.M.E.T.). Ask for references.  I will be happy to provide you with as many references from previous clients as you want.  Call those clients and ask them about their experience with HouseTek. The Report.  Inspectors are going to vary widely on report styles that can range from the minimal checklist (acceptable/not acceptable), to the fluffy jargon-filled narrative (blah-blah).  Inspection reports can be difficult to understand.  Items marked as fair, poor, or inadequate without any further explanation will not help you understand what the problem is or what exactly to repair.  Make sure that the inspector always specifies the exact problem and recommended repairs.  You will like my reporting style.  You won't have to wade through a bunch of canned nonsense that has nothing to do with your house, or wondering why was this component 'checked' off as 'poor'?
HouseTek Inspections
Copyright © 2015 HouseTek Professional Home Inspections
“Inspection Excellence”
Your Protection Is My Business!

Hiring an Inspector

 

Price is What You Pay. Value is What You Get."  - Warren Buffett Getting an INDEPENDENT (not referred to by an agent), expert opinion on the operability of the structure and its systems is smart buying. But, not all home inspectors have the same experience, training, certifications, or ethics.  How do you make sure you hire the right person for the job? When shopping for a home inspector, it's vital that you do your homework and interview each inspector based on the checklist below. Do not go by price alone.  When hiring me, you're hiring an advocate with your best interest in mind to give you my expert opinion on the house's condition - in writing. With that in mind, making sure that you're hiring an inspector with plenty of knowledge and training means not shopping by price alone. Training, certifications, licensing, and continuing education costs money. When it comes to home inspections, as with most things, you get what you pay for.  Don't go with a builder who 'dabbles' in home inspections for a 'quick easy 300 bucks', or the guy who gets the cheesiest certification possible, or the agent referred inspector who doesn't want to 'kill the deal'.  You probably won't get the service you expect. You will come out WAY ahead by hiring a careful, independent inspector who may find thousands of dollars in repairs. This way you can make sure things are fixed, or renegotiate a new price prior to closing.  OR you can save twenty bucks on a fly-by-night guy who rubber-stamps a house as basically ok, many times to just avoid conflict. Research credentials.  Find an ASHI Certified Member (American Society of Home Inspectors). Since there are no national standards for home inspectors, one of the best things you can do to find out about an inspectors qualifications is to ask what associations they belong to.  ASHI is the real deal.  ASHI requires training, experience, continuing education and passing nationally recognized exams (not a non-proctored on-line exam). Not all associations are created equal.  Check out the associations minimum requirements.  Some associations have candidate and associate, or other levels that basically mean that the inspector has not met the requirements to be a full member.  Also ask what certifications the inspector holds and then research them as well.   Not only am I an ASHI Certified Inspector, I am Code Certified Residential Building Inspector, state licensed, and college degreed in engineering (B.S.M.E.T.). Ask for references.  I will be happy to provide you with as many references from previous clients as you want.  Call those clients and ask them about their experience with HouseTek. The Report.  Inspectors are going to vary widely on report styles that can range from the minimal checklist (acceptable/not acceptable), to the fluffy jargon-filled narrative (blah-blah).  Inspection reports can be difficult to understand.  Items marked as fair, poor, or inadequate without any further explanation will not help you understand what the problem is or what exactly to repair.  Make sure that the inspector always specifies the exact problem and recommended repairs.  You will like my reporting style.  You won't have to wade through a bunch of canned nonsense that has nothing to do with your house, or wondering why was this component 'checked' off as 'poor'?