HouseTek Inspections
Copyright © 2015 HouseTek Professional Home Inspections
 Inspection Excellence 
home inspection, house inspector, inspection, inspector, Real Estate Listings, home buyers and sellers
Your Protection Is My Business!
Iron Mountain MI Home Inspector, Home Inspector, Iron Mountain, Florence WI, real-estate inspector, Upper Peninsula Home Inspector, Wisconsin Home Inspector, MIchigan Home Inspector, Wisconsin Home Inspector, Crystal Falls Home Inspector, Wisconsin, Michi real-estate inspector HouseTek Professional Home Inspections - Your Protection is My Business!

Radon Gas

 

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. It is colorless, odorless and undetectable other than through testing. Please don't take this lightly. Have the house tested - I did mine. Radon gas is created when uranium in the soil decays. The gas then seeps through any access point into the home. Common entry points are cracks in the foundation, poorly sealed pipes, sump pits, or any other opening into the house. Once in the home, the gas can build up over time to dangerous levels. The Environmental Protection Agency of the US Government has set a threshold of 4 pico curies per liter as the safe level. As humans are exposed to the gas over a period of years, it can have a significant and detrimental effect. How widespread is the problem? My inspection area of Michigan and Wisconsin is designated as Moderate Potential Zone 2 - counties that have a predicted average indoor radon screening level between 2 and 4 pCi/L (see the zone map from the EPA at http://www.epa.gov/radon/zonemap.html). Dickinson and Iron Counties, for example, have a 30-35% risk that radon levels exceed the EPA recommended limit of 4 pCi/l.  Testing for radon comes in two forms: active and passive. Active devices constantly measure the levels of radon in a portion of the home and displays those results. Passive devices collect samples over a period of time and then are taken away and analyzed. Either method can help you determine your level of risk. I do an EPA approved short term passive test, which is the fastest way to get accurate results. For real estate transactions quick response is a must.  Do-it-yourself kits are available from a number of outlets, normally with passive devices, but this takes too much time to get results for a one-time test taker. The EPA web site (http://www.epa.gov/radon/manufact.htm) provides information on finding appropriate resources and testing devices. If high concentrations of radon are found in your home, you have a couple options. In some cases, sealing all cracks and access points is all that is needed. Usually, a sub-slab ventilation system must be installed.  In any case, a professional radon mitigator should be engaged to ensure that the radon is effectively eliminated. Typical radon mitigation systems can cost between $800 and $2500, according to the EPA. If you’re buying or selling a home, radon can be a significant issue. Buyers should be aware of the radon risk in their area. The EPA always recommends testing. The cost of the test can be built into the house price. If test results already exist, make sure they are recent or that the home has not been significantly renovated since the test was performed. If in doubt, get a new test done. If you’re selling a home, having a recent radon test is a great idea. By being proactive, you can assure potential buyers that there is no risk and avoid the issue from the start. So whether you have an old home or a new one, live in an old mining town or in the middle of the Great Plains, radon is a reality. But it is a reality that we can live with. Proper testing and mitigation, can eliminate radon as a health threat. For more information, visit the EPA web site on radon at http://www.epa.gov/radon.
HouseTek Inspections
Copyright © 2015 HouseTek Professional Home Inspections
“Inspection Excellence”
Your Protection Is My Business!

Radon Gas

 

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. It is colorless, odorless and undetectable other than through testing. Please don't take this lightly. Have the house tested - I did mine. Radon gas is created when uranium in the soil decays. The gas then seeps through any access point into the home. Common entry points are cracks in the foundation, poorly sealed pipes, sump pits, or any other opening into the house. Once in the home, the gas can build up over time to dangerous levels. The Environmental Protection Agency of the US Government has set a threshold of 4 pico curies per liter as the safe level. As humans are exposed to the gas over a period of years, it can have a significant and detrimental effect. How widespread is the problem? My inspection area of Michigan and Wisconsin is designated as Moderate Potential Zone 2 - counties that have a predicted average indoor radon screening level between 2 and 4 pCi/L (see the zone map from the EPA at http://www.epa.gov/radon/zonemap.html). Dickinson and Iron Counties, for example, have a 30- 35% risk that radon levels exceed the EPA recommended limit of 4 pCi/l.  Testing for radon comes in two forms: active and passive. Active devices constantly measure the levels of radon in a portion of the home and displays those results. Passive devices collect samples over a period of time and then are taken away and analyzed. Either method can help you determine your level of risk. I do an EPA approved short term passive test, which is the fastest way to get accurate results. For real estate transactions quick response is a must.  Do-it-yourself kits are available from a number of outlets, normally with passive devices, but this takes too much time to get results for a one-time test taker. The EPA web site (http://www.epa.gov/radon/manufact.htm) provides information on finding appropriate resources and testing devices. If high concentrations of radon are found in your home, you have a couple options. In some cases, sealing all cracks and access points is all that is needed. Usually, a sub-slab ventilation system must be installed.  In any case, a professional radon mitigator should be engaged to ensure that the radon is effectively eliminated. Typical radon mitigation systems can cost between $800 and $2500, according to the EPA. If you’re buying or selling a home, radon can be a significant issue. Buyers should be aware of the radon risk in their area. The EPA always recommends testing. The cost of the test can be built into the house price. If test results already exist, make sure they are recent or that the home has not been significantly renovated since the test was performed. If in doubt, get a new test done. If you’re selling a home, having a recent radon test is a great idea. By being proactive, you can assure potential buyers that there is no risk and avoid the issue from the start. So whether you have an old home or a new one, live in an old mining town or in the middle of the Great Plains, radon is a reality. But it is a reality that we can live with. Proper testing and mitigation, can eliminate radon as a health threat. For more information, visit the EPA web site on radon at http://www.epa.gov/radon.